The BPI Summer Residency

Our 4th Annual Residency Starts on July 17th

The BPI Summer Residency is an intensive and immersive two-week sequence of workshops that is returning to Bard’s Annandale campus for cohort 2022. This hands-on, experiential training in the hows, whys, and whats of BPI’s approach to college-in-prison also includes more technical conversations about the mechanics and strategies of building robust, ambitious, and successful college-in-prison and reentry programs in different locations and institutional contexts. Workshops are led by BPI staff and subject matter experts from across the academic; reentry and alumni affairs; national engagement and advocacy; development; and senior leadership teams.

The Residency is a professional development opportunity structured to encourage residents to build community, compare notes and exchange ideas, and create lasting bonds and a life-long network of support across their cohort, past and future Residency cohorts, BPI staff, and Bard’s Consortium for the Liberal Arts in Prison. These two weeks in-person are followed by webinars, convenings, and other events to facilitate a community of practice across cohorts and programs.

The 2022 cohort pulls from a broad spectrum of emerging leaders in the field of college-in-prison representing public and private institutions, community colleges, small liberal arts schools, and large research institutions as faculty, program directors, newly hired practitioners, graduate students, alumni, and directly impacted people representing eleven states and seven nations.

Each year’s cohort is comprised of educators who engaged in BPI’s program-building technical assistance and consulting in the prior year, along with new staff hires from BPI and across the Consortium for the Liberal Arts in Prison. Room and board and other expenses for the two-weeks come at no cost to residents.

This year we welcome Dr. Baz Dreisinger Senior Advisor for Global Initiatives and Founding Executive Director of Incarceration Nations Network and Ramiro Gual, BPI Global Research Fellow, who will both support BPI’s entry into the international landscape of college-in-prison.

“The generous, frank, strategic, compassionate, brilliant offerings of the Bard Prison Initiative faculty, administrators and staff were a goldmine. I struck gold.”

– Cohort 2021 Resident, Sharon Varallo, Augustana Prison Education Program

Summer Residency Attendees at Bard College Campus

Summer Residency Schedule from July 17–29

Sunday 7/17

6pm | Welcome Dinner


Monday 7/18

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Introductions, Welcome, and History

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Paradoxes of College-In-Prison

4–5:45pm | Kingston shopping trip

6pm | Dinner

7–9pm | Student Orientation


Tuesday 7/19

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Language and Thinking: Bard’s Introduction to College

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Academic Overview and Writing Curriculum

6pm | Dinner


Wednesday 7/20

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Faculty Recruitment and Hiring

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Faculty Orientation and Disorientation

6pm | Dinner

7pm–9pm | Math Curriculum and Pedagogy


Thursday 7/21

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Academic Resources: Advising, Research Support and Libraries

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Tutors and Undergrads

6pm | Development Dinner

7pm–9pm | Thinking about Fundraising


Friday 7/22

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Introduction to BPI Admissions and Essay Reading

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Admissions Interviews: Philosophy and Practice

5pm | Dinner with Baz Dreisinger, BPI Senior Advisor for Global Initiatives

6pm–9pm | Introducing Incarceration Nations Network

Monday 7/25

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | A Conversation with Site Directors

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Cultivating College Community Inside

6pm–8pm | Dinner with Site Directors and Alums

7pm-8pm | Talk by BPI Global Fellow Ramiro Gual


Tuesday 7/26

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Practitioner Wellness: Sustainability, Compassion Fatigue & Secondary Trauma

6pm–7pm | Dinner

7pm–9pm | Sharing Self Care Practices


Wednesday 7/27

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Development Strategies and Planning

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Working with Corrections

5pm-7:30pm | Dinner at Kline Commons

 


Thursday 7/28

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

10am–12pm | Reentry: Getting Started

12pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm | Transition Home: The BPI Transitional Workshop

6pm–7pm | Alumni Dinner & Alumni Affairs


Friday 7/29

8am–9:45am | Breakfast at Kline Commons

11am–1pm | Commencement Planning: Theory and Principles

1pm–2pm | Lunch at Kline Commons

2pm–4pm  | Getting Home

5pm–7pm | Farewell Party

Workshop Descriptions

Philosophical Approaches (the whys of the work)

Introductions, Welcome, and History

Workshop Leaders: Max Kenner, Jessica Neptune, Delia Mellis

To begin, we will introduce ourselves and take a look at what we’ll be doing in the weeks ahead. We will share a brief history of the field of college-in-prison and the specific story of BPI, and how BPI fits — and doesn’t fit —into the world of higher ed. Together, we will reflect on our hopes and plans for this work: a look at where we’ve each been and where we’re all going.


Paradoxes of College-in-Prison

Workshop Leader: Megan Callaghan

This workshop engages the rich, necessary contradictions inherent to the endeavor of college-in-prison and how we think about those contradictions in practice.


New Student Orientation

Workshop Leaders: Max Kenner, Jessica Neptune, Delia Mellis

How we build on the admissions experience to inspire, challenge, and situate students to succeed in the college: by being forthright and welcoming, and by inviting students into a long-term relationship with the college. Max will conduct an orientation just as we do inside, with participants in the student role.


Commencement Planning: Theory and Principles

Workshop Leaders: Megan Callaghan

This workshop offers a framework for thinking about and planning commencements in prison including what to expect for budgets and logistics, working with DOCs, thinking about families and guests, coordinating with the college and how to reproduce the ceremony in ways that bring the college into the prison and underscore the momentousness of the occasion. It serves as a bookend counter-part to the Student Orientation workshop in an approach to institution building that messages the centrality of the college as the relevant institution in students’ lives.

Academics and Practice

Language and Thinking: Bard’s Introduction to College

Workshop Leader: Delia Mellis and Robert Tynes

In this session we encounter Bard’s Institute for Writing and Thinking methodology and Bard’s Language and Thinking (L&T) first-year experience. All Bard students begin their first year with this intensive introduction to reading, writing, and thinking for college. It aims to disrupt their expectations and reorient their thinking about what it’s like to do rigorous, collaborative intellectual work. We will learn by doing, going through a quick but intense version of a day in L&T so that participants can get a sense of what the workshop makes possible.


Academic Overview and Writing Curriculum

Workshop Leaders: Megan Callaghan and Delia Mellis

This session will detail the specifics of the BPI AA and BA curriculum, its goals and reasoning — including its relationship to main campus requirements and approach, with an eye toward applying some core principles to curricular development at your own college, reflecting your own institutions’ degree requirements and hallmarks of the undergraduate experience. In doing so we will elaborate upon the L&T experience and how it leads into Bard’s writing-based experience.


Math Curriculum and Pedagogy

Workshop Leader: Amy Shapiro

We will get down into the specifics of the BPI math curriculum and pedagogy — what they are, how they parallel and diverge from main campus; why and how they obviate/address remediation; particular benefits and challenges of this approach.


Faculty Recruitment and Hiring

Workshop Leaders: Megan Callaghan and Madhu Kaza

Sharing strategies for identifying good candidates, spotting dangers, and bringing people into the work.


Faculty Orientation and Disorientation

Workshop Leaders: Megan Callaghan and Claire Lindsay

We will discuss how to introduce new faculty to college-in-prison and answer the challenges raised by official orientations.


Academic Resources: Advising, Research Support and Libraries

Workshop Leaders: Andres Pletch, James Kim, Nikko Vaughn, Delia Mellis
  • Academic Resources support students outside the classroom in responding to the myriad challenges of college work — conceptual, logistical, personal, and professional.
    Academic advising involves helping students navigate their trajectory through the college, from course selection to complicated conversations with faculty; strategizing with them around academic challenges, both intellectual and logistical; and staying focused through the conflicts that can arise between student life and everything else.
  • BPI students rely on research support directed by a professor on staff who manages a team of work-study students who find and print out materials for them in response to requests that may be as specific as an article citation derived from the JSTOR index, or as broad as a general request for information on the Cultural Revolution in China.*
  • At every BPI site there is a college library, which may be comprised of several bookcases inside the college classroom or could be an entire room full of shelves, with study tables and a whiteboard on wheels. How do we build, organize, and protect the library? Who is responsible for it?

*This workshop will be supplemented by a virtual workshop on getting the JSTOR database later in the summer led by Ithaca S+R Manager, JSTOR Access in Prison and BPI alumna Stacy Burnett ‘20, open to all Summer Residency of Cohort 2022, past cohorts, and members of BPI’s Consortium For the Liberal Arts in Prison.


Tutors and Undergrads

Workshop Leaders: Claire Lindsay,  Hannah Henry, Rodney Spivey-Jones

Peer tutoring is central to the BPI experience. Like their counterparts on the main campus, students inside may take a for-credit course to learn basic principles and practices of effective, student-centered pedagogy. Those who go on to become writing and math tutors are a crucial force in the collaborative learning ethos and practice that define the college community inside. This community extends to include undergraduates from the main campus, similarly trained through the college’s Learning Commons, who come in weekly to the prisons. This session situates the hows and whys of tutoring within the big picture of the college inside. In addition to hearing from those who train and manage both categories of tutors (those inside and those coming in from outside), we will talk with alum who have worked as tutors about the ways in which tutoring figured in their own educational trajectory.

Technical Approaches (the hows of the work)

Thinking about Fundraising

Workshop Leaders: Ellen Henneberry and Kate Cox

The first in a series of conversations with BPI’s development team, this workshop lays the groundwork for shaping your program’s philosophical approach to fundraising. We will discuss how to get comfortable asking for money and explore our assumptions and challenges related to fundraising.


Development Strategies and Planning

Workshop Leaders: Ellen Henneberry and Kate Cox

Conversations with BPI’s development team continue in this session as we explore strategies for how to plan fundraising on an annual basis. The team will share insights and guidance related to the nuts and bolts for building out the vision, capacity, and infrastructure to seek out, obtain, and retain support from donors and foundations.


Introduction to BPI Admissions and Essay Reading

Workshop Leaders: Madeleine George, James Kim, Jose Pineda

Admissions is the first encounter with the college; we engage with prospective students exactly as we do those who are enrolled —- with respect, rigor, and deep interest. The admissions process crystallizes the BPI model; in this session we will explore both process and philosophy.

We will spend time reading and scoring admissions essays so that participants gain a hands on experience with the BPI method. What are we looking at, what are we looking for, and how do we decide who gets an interview?


Admissions Interviews: Philosophy and Practice

Workshop Leaders: Madeleine George, James Kim, Jose Pineda

In this workshop we will explore the art of the admissions interview, watching and then practicing together how to engage with prospective students so that they show us what kind of student they could be, and how we show them something about what it would be like to be a student at Bard.


A Conversation with Site Directors

Workshop Leaders: Amy Shapiro, and Robert Tynes

Join BPI site directors to talk about the work on the ground. Site directors, all of whom began as faculty, will share their insight and experience. How do they approach the ethics and logistics of managing a site in partnership both with students and corrections? What’s the one thing they wish they’d known when they started the job? How do they approach tough conversations – with faculty, with students, with administration?


Cultivating College Community Inside

Workshop Leaders: James Kim, Tammar Cancer, and Shawn Young

The daily work of sustaining the college inside: supporting students, communicating with prison staff, and managing faculty. Site directors and alums share stories about building and extending community inside, the possibilities and challenges that emerge every day.


Practitioner Wellness: Sustainability, Compassion Fatigue & Secondary Trauma

Workshop Leaders: James Kim, Delia Mellis, Joe Williams , James Kim

This workshop explores some strategies for acknowledging, coping with, and building resilience in the face of our students’ historical and ongoing traumatic experiences. How do we support their well-being and our own?


Working with Corrections

Workshop Leaders: Megan Callaghan, Robert Tynes

This conversation will cover tips and strategies for negotiation with the DOC. What does the college need from the DOC? What to consider in an MOU? How to navigate central office and facility level leadership. Taking up space in the prison. Classification and movement. Recruitment of future students. Defining what’s “college business.”

Reentry and Alumni

Reentry: Getting Started

Workshop Leaders: Shawn Young and Jed Tucker

We will experience BPI’s introduction to reentry as first-year students do and then learn about the history of reentry at BPI and the reentry workshops inside: what do students need most as they prepare to leave prison and what can we provide? How do we guide them toward resources? We will build connections between BPI’s reentry work on the inside and the BPI Transitional Workshop.


Transition Home: The BPI Transitional Workshop

Workshop Leaders: Alicia Williams, Nikko Vaughn, Daniel Cho

Alumni staff leaders of BPI’s Transitional Workshop (TW) lead us through an introductory TW session and then describe the content and experience of the six-week workshop for recently released alumni/ae, which covers housing, continuing education, engaging with technology, wellness, career development, and navigating social services.


Alumni Advocacy and Government Affairs Dinner

Workshop Leader: Dyjuan Tatro

Join in a conversationcoversation with BPI’s Senior Government Affairs Officer to learn about alumni-led efforts to build government support and new funding streams for college-in-prison and develop relationships and familiarity between elected officials and your program. Dyjuan Tatro will go over how and why he created a government affairs role at BPI, what he has accomplished in this role over the years, and tips and strategies for engaging elected officials in college-in-prison work including possibilities for direct funding and political support. We will also explore potential pitfalls and what to watch out for.

Additional Virtual Workshops Coming 2022–2023

JSTOR Offline

Workshop Leader: Stacy Burnett ’20

This virtual workshop takes place as a webinar follow up to the two week in person sequence and is open to BPI’s broader community of practice including residents across cohorts, and the Consortium.


Career Specializations and Post-Degree Coursework

Workshop Leader: Gabriel Mendes

This virtual workshop takes place as a webinar follow up to the two week in person sequence and is open to BPI’s broader community of practice including residents across cohorts, and the Consortium.

This workshop will detail public health and education both as curricular specializations in prison, and as career paths for students post-release; it will also outline the ways in which these areas match widespread student interest in making positive contributions to their communities with viable, rewarding, and ambitious career paths. The workshop will be led by program directors and alumni active in the fields.

BPI’s Public Health Program is a direct intervention in a problem widely identified but rarely confronted head on: the underrepresentation of justice-system involved professionals in crafting life-determining public health policy and programs. Public health at BPI prepares students and alumni — uniquely positioned through experience, education and expertise — to deliver services, innovate practices, and advocate for equitable policies in public health, health care, and the human services.

The Education Program at BPI offers coursework and experience in the field of education, writ large. Education coursework and post-release fellowships enable students to deepen their understanding of the complex issues surrounding education and schooling in the US, as well as to expand their sense of possibilities for professional pursuits in the field. The program introduces BPI students and alum to an array of education fields to further support and articulate potential pathways for their careers and/or further study; it also provides attention to varieties and aspects of educational praxis, including peer tutoring and participatory action research projects.


Getting Ready for Pell and Public Funding

Workshop Leaders: Megan Callaghan and Rupali Rifenburg

This virtual workshop takes place as a webinar follow up to the two week in person sequence and is open to BPI’s broader community of practice including residents across cohorts, and the Consortium.


Communications, Digital Marketing, and Social Media

Workshop Leader: Anita Merk

This virtual workshop takes place as a webinar follow up to the two week in person sequence and is open to BPI’s broader community of practice including residents across cohorts, and the Consortium.


Building College Computer Labs in Prisons

Workshop Leader: Jeff Gregory

This virtual workshop takes place as a webinar follow up to the two week in person sequence and is open to BPI’s broader community of practice including residents across cohorts, and the Consortium.

Testimonial

“BPI summer fellowship was THE best and most thorough training I have ever taken part in. The content was so thought out and impressive. We covered everything it takes to start, build or grow a college in prison program and learned from experts who have been doing this work for over 20 years. I am not a higher ed in prison professional. However, as a formerly incarcerated individual who has learned in prison and continued that education upon release, it provided me with immense professional development and personal growth. The BPI fellowship I took part in was entirely virtual, and even though I had to join via zoom. Every morning I woke up with renewed vigor and excitement to learn again with my fellow cohort members. For those in higher education in prison space, wherever you are in the process, you will learn and take away so much from this fellowship. You will learn from professors who teach inside, administrators who run the program, alumni who have benefitted from BPI instruction, and know that your work will have an immense impact.

I feel so fortunate that I could take part in this fellowship. I gained much more than just what was advertised (which was a lot) I gained a community, a sense of belonging, a sense of purpose and a renewed hope for higher education in prison. Immediately after the fellowship, I was placed in a position to implement what I learned during this fellowship, helping formerly incarcerated students pursue higher education after release. The hands-on approach to this fellowship cannot be underestimated. The training/workshops were not theoretical; we actively engaged and practiced much of what was being taught during this fellowship.”

– Cohort 2021 Resident, Michaell Griggs, Pitzer College, class of 2021

BPI Summer Residency for Future Leasers of College-in-Prison (Female student writing on paper)

Bard’s main campus in Annandale-on-Hudson, NY

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